Gallery

Welcome to the Gallery!
On this page we showcase the work of our members.  Many of our members are capturing excellent images with basic equipment that anyone can use. If you want to learn how to take astronomical photographs, come along to one of our monthly meetings and speak to any of the members that you see featured on this page.
Members - we want your images! Help us to keep this page fresh by sending your images to:
ewellastro.editor@gmail.com

Important Notice: All images are protected by copyright and remain the property of the person who made them. No images on this page may be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission of both the image owner and the editor. Please respect the rights of our members who have been kind enough to share their work on this page.

Click on an image to enlarge it:

Images of the Total Solar Eclipse from Gerard O'Mara
 
 
 

Latest Solar Images from Ron Johnson
 
 
 
 
The images were taken via a102mm f9.8 OG with full aperture solar filter and an Imaging Source monochrome camera with an IR filter.

More of Jupiter from Sagar Shringarpure
 
 

Images from Shirish Phade
 
 

Images of Jupiter from Sagar Shringarpure
 
 

Images of Jupiter from Valerie May
 
 
Valerie captured these images just before midnight in Burgh Heath on 8 April 2017 using a Canon PowerShot A1200 through her Celestroon Nextar 6SE. The image of Jupier and moons was at x60, and the other was at x125. Thank you Valerie for sharing these with us.
Latest Images of Venus from Ron Johnson
 
 




Solar Images by Ron Johnson
 

 
                                                                                          
 

 


 
 

 

Milky Way by Geoff Walker

"My first attempt of stacking"

This picture of the Milky Way was taken on Ranmore common and stacked from 9 20 second exposures with a Cannon 1100D DLSR camera with 18mm Lens.

What's stacking?
Stacking is the process of taking several exposures or video footage, then using computer software to align and merge the separate images into one.  This process allows faint objects to be enhanced, and fine detail that would otherwise be invisible to be sharply defined in the resulting image 


Milky Way by Jay Kallee











We aim to keep the images on this page as fresh as possible, so if you want to see older images, please follow the link to the Image Archive at the bottom of the page.
Subpages (1): Image Archive